Dennis Wheatley Podcasts

The place to post anything DW-related
Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Dennis Wheatley Podcasts

Postby Darren » Mon 4 Feb, 2013 16:11:40

Last July I was outvoted by 3 to 1 and we got a dog as a family pet. I’m beginning to warm to the thing and do my share of taking it for a walk. But, even though I am fortunate to live in a beautiful part of Yorkshire, there are only so many walks you can go in a 60 minute dog walking radius.

To ease the boredom I have discovered the modern concept of podcasts and plan my walks in advance by downloading a podcast to look forward to listening to on the walk.

You won’t be surprised to learn that there aren’t that many Dennis Wheatley podcasts but there are some really good ones.

I thought it might be useful to have a list of them in his online library. If anyone has knowledge of others then please add them to this list – they will help improve my relationship with the dog.

To make them easier to find I will supply the website address for those that want to stream it through their PC/Laptop/Tablet and also a search option to use on itunes for those that want to download it onto their ipod/iphone/ipad.

1. Tina Rosenberg Lecture
itunes search: New America NYC: D for Deception
website: http://newamerica.net/events/2012/new_a ... _deception
Superb podcast – highly recommended. This is a theatrical lecture and discussion by Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Tina Rosenberg about DW’s deception plans, Gregory Sallust and his influence on Ian Fleming.

2. Discussion on the films The Devil Rides Out and To The Devil A Daughter
Itunes search: Movie Matters episode 9
Website: http://moviematterspodcast.blogspot.co. ... ers-9.html
There are quite a few podcasts that discuss these two films but this is one of the more intelligent ones.
There are two presenters one of whom is a Hammer film enthusiast (Lee Howard) and the other has approached these films because he is a DW fan (Michael Mackenzie). Lee Howard begins by giving a brief resume of Hammer and where these films fit into its history and then Michael Mackenzie gives a small talk about DW and then they both discuss the films. Lee discusses their “Hammerâ€￾ qualities and Michael provides the view as a DW reader. Good fun.

The BBC have made available their back catalogue of Desert Island Discs as podcasts that go back decades – there are many that are unavailable and unfortunately castaway DW from November 1972 is one of them (see http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009nb42 for DW’s choice of music – I imagine you will have discussed this elsewhere).

And of course we have the BBC interview, Dennis Wheatley: A Letter To Posterity which I can’t find on itunes.
Website: http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/57223

I'll add more as I find them.
Regards,

Darren.

shanedwyer
Level5
Level5
Posts: 133
Joined: Sun 21 Oct, 2012 15:20:17
Location: London

Postby shanedwyer » Tue 5 Feb, 2013 16:18:47

Many, many thanks for that Darren. I’ve just downloaded the BBC interview with DW and am listening to it (and enjoying it enormously) as I type.

Permit me to raise a virtual glass to you sir!

Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Postby Darren » Tue 5 Feb, 2013 18:14:33

Cheers, Shane. I got that link from elsewhere in this library. Whilst your drinking your wine I highly recommend the Tina Rosenberg lecture. The debate at the end is fascinating.
Regards,



Darren.

Charles
Level5
Level5
Posts: 502
Joined: Sat 4 Jun, 2005 19:25:59
Location: U.K.

Postby Charles » Tue 26 Feb, 2013 17:40:32

I just listened to Tina's lecture and also enjoyed it.

In case it's of interest, two of the people who provide voice-over comments in the first section are Phil Baker (you probably recognised his voice) and Annette Wheatley (Anthony Wheatley's wife and DW's daughter-in-law). Those who have attended our Conventions will recognise the third one :D !

What with the music-and-all, I thought it was a most enjoyable way to spend 50 minutes !

All best as always !
Charles

Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Postby Darren » Mon 4 Mar, 2013 15:51:31

Not having had the pleasure of attending a convention (an omission I intend to correct this year), nor met any of the fine DW scholars that have attended I'll have to guess who the third one is.

Clearly DW related podcasts are few - I am struggling to find any further ones of quality.

However, this thread does suggest an opportunity. Every year enthusiastic DW experts come together to spend a weekend sharing their DW pleasures. Is there scope at the convention for an hour discussion on DW that could be recorded and uploaded onto this website as a podcast?

It would give members unable to attend a further flavour of the annual convention experience, and the podcast itself could promote DW to a wider audience. As well as capturing for posterity more of the insights and knowledge of this site's legendary contributors.

And it would be easy to set up. A discussion title, someone to act as Chair - the wine will do the rest.

I think I've put this on the wrong topic - the DW Convention 2013 posts would be more appropriate.

Cheers All.
Regards,



Darren.

Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Postby Darren » Fri 8 Mar, 2013 16:33:42

I add this just for completeness. There is a 5 minute video excerpt of the Tina Rosenberg lecture. We probably all guessed right - it identifies Charles as the third voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWpUukxvQ5w
Regards,



Darren.

Charles
Level5
Level5
Posts: 502
Joined: Sat 4 Jun, 2005 19:25:59
Location: U.K.

Postby Charles » Fri 8 Mar, 2013 23:59:52

Well spotted, Darren - guilty as charged :D !!!
Charles

Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Postby Darren » Sat 14 Sep, 2013 14:28:49

I have found another interesting podcast series hosted by a couple of American guys who are obsessed with British horror films. The series is called Professor Cushing's Crypt of the Macabre. The home page can be found at http://cryptofthemacabre.blogspot.co.uk/

It is interesting to hear a US persepective on British horror films.

They visit Hammer's The Devil Rides Out early on in episode 3 - http://cryptofthemacabre.blogspot.co.uk ... results=21 :smt077

And they love it - rating it exceedingly high. There is some (though minimal) discussion about DW, but if you are a fan of British horror films I think you will enjoy the series in general.

:smt023
Regards,



Darren.

shanedwyer
Level5
Level5
Posts: 133
Joined: Sun 21 Oct, 2012 15:20:17
Location: London

Postby shanedwyer » Tue 17 Sep, 2013 15:26:47

That podcast has just been keeping me company as I waded through a morass of paperwork. And having those affable Yanks on in the background did help dull the misery. So, thank you for that Darren.

Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Postby Darren » Tue 17 Sep, 2013 17:14:13

Cheers Shane.

I know it's trivial, but the opening theme music to Professor Cushing's Crypt of the Macabre is the opening to the song Black Sabbath by Black Sabbath. The very weak Dennis Wheatley connection to this is that the lyrics to that song were allegedly inspired by the DW black magic books that a member of the band was reading at the time (1969).

As I said - trivial, but there is a neatness there that I find comforting.
Regards,



Darren.

ericmocata
Level5
Level5
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat 7 Jul, 2012 02:19:42

Postby ericmocata » Wed 18 Sep, 2013 06:06:34

Thanks for pointing that podcast out, Darren. Being a big horror fan and a long time fan of Hammer, Amicus, Tigon, etc. this is fun to listen to. Also, I was insanely happy to hear that somebody else is really bugged by that doofy way of running that Rex has in the Devil Rides Out. I can only assume that is the way Leon Greene really runs, as I can't imagine the thought process that led him to think that Rex would hold his elbows in while swinging his hands about like an idiot.

And just to comment on Shane's post... it's a bit funny that if you're a Brit, all Americans are yanks, but if you're American, only people from the northern U.S. are yanks, which I suppose is better than something like "those colonial wankers". So this has me wondering, is there a slang term for the English that we Americans use that in England or perhaps all of the UK only applies to a certain region?

By the way, my keyboard is very American apparently, as it auto-corrected "wankers" to "wanders". In fact, it did it two more times as I attempted to type that last sentence. Which is a shame, since I think British slang is much more fun than American slang most of the time and it tends to slip into my daily speech, but then it is a real pain to type.

Darren
Level5
Level5
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue 8 Dec, 2009 20:12:43
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Postby Darren » Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:11:11

That's interesting. I'm often guilty of using the term "Yanks" to cover all the US. Is this offensive to non-Yanks?

I have noticed on many occasions that "Yanks" often refer to England when in context of the conversation they are clearly referring to the whole of the UK. I imagine this will annoy the Scottish, Welsh and NI nationalists.

I'm still waiting for Yorkshire to gain independance.
Regards,



Darren.

shanedwyer
Level5
Level5
Posts: 133
Joined: Sun 21 Oct, 2012 15:20:17
Location: London

Postby shanedwyer » Wed 18 Sep, 2013 16:33:03

‘Wanker’ is an interesting word. Its etymology’s rather obscure, but sources suggest that the word first saw light of day with the wartime RAF.

One can only wonder if Wing Commander RAFVR Wheatley ever had recourse to use it from time to time.

ericmocata
Level5
Level5
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat 7 Jul, 2012 02:19:42

Postby ericmocata » Sat 21 Sep, 2013 01:13:27

Yes, Darren, you absolutely correct. Many people in the U.S. seem to think England and U.K. are interchangeable. Most also probably believe Wales is some weird town in the middle of nowhere in England. I suppose it gets down to this idea of "British" (and even Britain, to my understanding, is not really interchangeable with U.K. since Great Britain doesn't include Northern Ireland but U.K. does) and what Americans think of in regards to that term. You will often hear somebody here say that somebody has a "British accent". Which, I guess isn't necessarily incorrect, but it is horribly vague. Usually those people mean English accent, but even then, there are a number of different accents in England that I have heard. I mean, Christopher Lee doesn't exactly sound like a cockney.

As for yank being offensive to some here. . . I guess it would depend on the person. I know some people would be rather upset and others probably wouldn't care.

And Shane, given the context of your statements about the word "wanker" (this stupid keyboard just auto-corrected me again and I had to type it 3 or 4 times before it would leave the word alone), I would assume that by wartime RAF, you are referring to the 1st World War. For some reason, I always imagined that word going back much farther, but then again, it does seem a bit more contemporary, I guess. How about "bollocks"? That's another fun one to say.

Although, I guess we are getting a bit off topic.

Cibator
Level4
Level4
Posts: 83
Joined: Thu 4 Sep, 2008 11:27:30
Location: New Zealand

Postby Cibator » Mon 23 Sep, 2013 11:42:44

I've been following this (and other language-related threads) with great interest. EricMocata, you're right about the large number of regional accents even within England, let alone the rest of the British Isles. Though this is also true of other countries - for instance, there are numerous variants of Italian, reflecting the patchwork nature of that country prior to unification in the 1860s. And I seem to recall reading that there are at least nine distinct American accents, though I can't remember now what they all were.

As for "wanker": my Penguin Dictionary of Historical Slang (an absolute treasure-chest of old-tyme insults) ascribes this to "late 19th / early 20th century", and asserts that it was originally spelt with an "h", ie whanker! (Wanker without the "h" was another term for "bloater" a kind of smoked fish.) The Shorter Oxford Dictionary in our house doesn't list "wanker" at all; not surprising I suppose, seeing the edition dates from the early 60s or before. I was highly amused when the word turned up on Married With Children as Peggy Bundy's maiden name ("Wanker women don't work!"). In Britain and other Commonwealth countries, it's a pretty opprobrious term, but evidently means little or nothing to TV audiences or other arbiters of taste in the US.

Finally, "bollocks", or "bollix" as the Collins dictionary says it's sometimes spelt in the USA. This, with its original spelling of "ballocks", is "very old" according to the PDHS and didn't start being regarded as a vulgarism till the 1840s. The derivation is obvious. It acquired its secondary meaning of "nonsense" round about 1900.
Fas est et ab hoste doceri


Return to “General Topics”