Similar Writers to Dennis Wheatley

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Stevie P
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Similar Writers to Dennis Wheatley

Post by Stevie P » Sat 29 Sep, 2007 10:12:17

As much as we DW fans would like it, he is not around to write any further books.

I have often wondered who are the authors who most closely write in the DW style and subject. When I say subject, I'm thinking particularly of the 'Black Magic' type of story.

The author Dion Fortune was suggested to me and I have two of her books in my possesion (The Sea Priestess and The Demon Lover) but haven't got round to reading them with all my other reading commitments at the moment.
I have a feeling they are not going to be in quite the same category.

I certainly cannot recall hearing of any fiction novel that includes anything like the storyline of 'The Devil Rides Out' but would love to hear from anyone who has.

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Post by Steve Whatley » Sat 29 Sep, 2007 18:23:04

Don't know of a plot similar to The Devil Rides Out, though there surely must be, as it's quite a basic idea - a group of friends save one of their number from something in which he should never have become involved. This could cover anything from dangerous sports or drug addiction to criminal activity, but somehow Black Magic seems far more exciting.

One book I tried some years ago is The Devils of D-Day, by Graham Masterton. This has a splendid plot concerning demonic entities which were employed during the Allied invasion of France, and which have ever since been trapped within abandonned tanks languishing in rural France. A historian releases them at his peril.... The setting is modern and the author makes the whole fantastic idea seem entirely plausible, much as DW was able to do. I seem to remember being a bit disappointed by the ending, so I don't recommend it too highly.

Graham Masterton is quite prolific, and apparently writes under at least four other names. Other titles include Charnel House, Flesh And Blood and Manitou.

Must admit though, one of the attractions of DW novels is the period settings; devil-worship in the 30's sounds far more interesting than devil-worship in 2007.

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Post by Stevie P » Sat 29 Sep, 2007 19:35:54

I totally agree with your last two lines;
Must admit though, one of the attractions of DW novels is the period settings; devil-worship in the 30's sounds far more interesting than devil-worship in 2007.


Having said that, when DW wrote the book it was set in the modern day (1934). Would the same book written now in someones flat in central London have the same impact if the Duke & Co. had to move the PC, Plasma TV and DVD player into another room in order to mark a Pentagram on the new wooden flooring. Maybe?
And in 70 years time, would 2007 it be looked back on as 'The good old days' !!
I certainly think a modern rendition of TDRO could be superb with all the modern film technology and modern acting ability we have now. I'm going over old ground, I know.

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Post by Jim » Sun 30 Sep, 2007 04:37:11

Have you read Alison Sage's re-write of TDRO for the "Fleshcreepers" series? She takes the story up to 1987, moves the climax to New York City, and brings the whole thing in with fewer than 160 pages!
Last edited by Jim on Sun 30 Sep, 2007 14:46:38, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Stevie P » Sun 30 Sep, 2007 10:23:28

No Jim, I haven't heard of it. I'll give it a try.

Did you think it was good?

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Post by Jim » Sun 30 Sep, 2007 20:23:36

To tell the truth, I have not read it yet, and I'm sure I would be mentally comparing it with the original, and the film version.

I only mentioned it to suggest that DW's plots could still be made to work in contemporary settings.

K R Cope

Post by K R Cope » Tue 2 Oct, 2007 17:14:08

Two recent reads which reminded me of DW's work:

"Sargasso" by Edwin Corley....a Bermuda Triangle yarn, several well-heeled and well-connected types investigating a mystery which kept me guessing throughout. A great holiday read, very DW-ish IMHO.

"Saucer" by Stephen Coonts....sort of Wheatley-ish science fiction. Again well-heeled coves who just happen to have the right connections (Uncle happens to own an aircraft factory, that sort of thing :lol: )

Don't know if the other books by these two authors follow any similar style?

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Post by caroline$-0 » Fri 25 Jul, 2008 23:09:30

Graham Masterton is good ,I especially enjoyed mirrors.

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Post by Alan » Mon 4 Aug, 2008 07:45:34

When I first read Kathleen Kurtz (may be a mis-spell there) I remember thinking how much like DW she was - same lucidity of style, aristocratic and highly moral protagonist, lots of genuinely researched occult lore and a real sense that the struggle betwen good and evil is being waged with the Earth as a battleground. Her stories about the Knights Templar in particular - I can't recall exact titles but I'm sure Google or Amazon can help.

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Post by Cibator » Sat 14 Mar, 2009 09:28:26

Allow me to recommend My Bones And My Flute, by Edgar Mittelholtzer, published around 1955 and in consequence probably a bit hard to find now.

The author had a suitably exotic background, being born and raised in British Guiana and later living for a time in Barbados, where he was to set several of his novels. Later still he moved to the UK where his career faltered badly and he ended by taking his own life in 1965.

Bones is set in Guyana and its main characters are from the coloured elite of that country. One of them comes into possession of an old manuscript written nearly 200 years before by a Dutch settler who came to a sticky end somewhere in the jungle. It requires anyone reading it to recover "... my bones and my flute and bury them with Christian rites". Those who physically touch the manuscript soon start to hear phantom flute music, at first as from afar but, as the days go by, gradually coming closer! Nightmares and strange manifestations also begin to intrude themselves ......

I found it a fine creepy yarn, with strong similarities in places to M R James (who is actually namechecked in the text), and given the chance would like to read it again some day.
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Post by davehibb » Wed 11 Nov, 2009 11:46:29

I've always struggled to find authors/books that cover the same sort of subject matter as in DW's occult novels.

I did read quite a bit of Graham Masterton in my teens. I remember loaning Devils Of D-Day from my school library and the Dream Warriors? triology? was enjoyable too.

More recently I read Descendant which I found enjoyable but I gave up on much of his stuff many years ago.

I suppose like much of the planet, Dan Brown's books have filled a little gap, although not strictly the same genre and I also read 'Twelve' by Jasper Kent recently which I liked very much.

It is historical fiction/supernatural so might appeal to people who like DW's work.

For my sins I'm currently reading the Twilight saga. I must admit I loved the movie so decided to read the books. Though with The Devil Is A Gentleman in the post I doubt I'll finish New Moon before it appears in the cinemas. :)

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Post by duncanpaul17 » Thu 12 Nov, 2009 20:45:13

Although not writing with a strictly black magic /occult theme. Phil Rickman does write stories with a paranormal theme, including his Rev Merrily Watkins series, where the main character is a deiverance consultant, a modern name for excorcist in the books.

DW does get a passing reference in the first two books of the series, making me wonder if DW may have been one of Phil Rickman's influences.

Also got me thinking which other writers may have been influenced by DW,possibly James Herbert for one, but that's probably another subject.

Duncan

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